What Does Water Damage Look Like?

water damage

Water damage may not always look like you expect it to. Certainly, a cascade through a downstairs ceiling or a wading pond in the basement is unmistakable evidence of water damage. However, the signs may be more subtle at other times, depending on the source and amount of water, and when the event occurred. Wherever and whenever you may notice the signs, water damage only gets worse as time elapses. Therefore, one of the first priorities is getting advice from a qualified professional water damage recovery service, ASAP.

Here are some of the many signs of water damage to be aware of:

  • Discoloration. Anywhere you see it—on walls, ceilings, or even floors—an unexplained change in color is often a sign that water is present somewhere in the structure. It may be yellow, brown, or chalky white stains. A dark area in a carpet may indicate that water from some source is soaking the pad beneath.  
  • Deteriorating paint. Bubbling or peeling interior paint may indicate the presence of water affecting the interior of the wall structure.
  • Sagging walls or ceiling. Sagging drywall panels in walls or in the ceiling usually mean the material has absorbed a large volume of water. In severe cases, the affected drywall may collapse at any time.
  • Tile or other flooring warped and/or loose. Tile or wood flooring that has buckled, cracked, or come loose may be evidence of water damage affecting the sub-floor.
  • Swollen or warping walls and sticky door casings. If walls appear to swell and doors become difficult to close or open, dimensional changes caused by chronic water exposure may be the hidden cause.   
  • “Sweating” walls. Water that has entered a wall cavity may initially trigger the appearance of a thin film of moisture droplets on the outside of the wall similar to sweating.  
  • Mold growth. Anywhere and anytime you notice signs of active mold growth—blotches of black or greenish growth on surfaces—some source of water is present or has been very recently.

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