How to Prevent Broken Water Pipes

Take a few steps to prevent broken water pipes and reduce your chances of expensive water damage and mold contamination, too. The most common cause of catastrophic water inundation isn’t outdoor flooding, it actually originates indoors with your own plumbing. A ruptured residential water supply line can release up to 50 gallons per minute. How many minutes will elapse before you are able to turn off water to the entire house at the main shutoff valve? Worst case scenario: Suppose you’re out of town for a few days when it happens?

Compared to all other alternatives, anything you can do now to prevent broken water pipes is clearly the preferred course.

prevent broken water pipesGet Your Pressure Checked by a Plumber

Water pressure in the main municipal water line is too high for residential plumbing. It’s typically reduced by a regulator valve located at your water meter or where the water supply line enters your house. If the regulator’s defective or improperly adjusted, indoor water pressure may be excessive and cause a ruptured pipe. In most cases, household water pressure should not exceed 65 p.s.i.

Don’t Put up With Leaks

Pinhole leaks, dribbles or seepage from indoor water supply lines, no matter how minor, should never be dismissed as “normal.” In most cases, the leakage you can actually see is only the external indication of major corrosion inside that may cause a total rupture — or a weakening joint that may blow out any day now. Visually inspect all the water supply lines for any signs of dripping or seepage, past or present, and call a plumber now if you see any.

Replace Galvanized Pipes

If your home was built in the 1970s or earlier, it may have galvanized steel piping. Over the years, this material internally rusts and corrodes, becoming prone to sudden failure. Galvanized pipe that is 40 years old is at the end of its expected life and should be replaced now with copper or PEX as a preventive measure to avoid flooding.

The water damage professionals at Rytech, Inc. are ready with more advice to prevent broken water pipes.

 

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